FTR Research

Blue Carbon: Offsetting carbon emission by conserving coastal vegetative ecosystems along the Indian coast

Blue Carbon: Offsetting carbon emission by conserving coastal vegetative ecosystems along the Indian coast

The global average atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration increased to 401 parts per million (ppm) in May 2014, the highest level in the past 8 million years. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that by the year 2050, global CO2 emissions must be reduced by 85% from levels seen in 2000 to prevent a global mean temperature increase of 2°C. To reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations a more recent approach has been suggested that include combined reduction of anthropogenic CO2 sources (mitigation) with supporting CO2 uptake and storage through the conservation of natural ecosystems with high C sequestration rates and capacity.

Greenhouse Gas Inventorization in Coastal Ecosystems of India

Greenhouse Gas Inventorization in Coastal Ecosystems of India

Several studies showed that coastal ecosystems (mainly mangroves, estuaries, lagoons, salt marsh waters and coral reefs) are the important sources of climatically active greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, impacting regional or even global tropospheric budgets. These ecosystems receive massive inputs of organic matter, which is decomposed in the coastal ocean and releases CO2 in India. Measurements of GHG emissions are relatively sparse from both Indian coastal ecosystems viz. from canopy, sediment and surrounding waters. There have been studies from the east coast of India, particularly mangrove ecosystems whereas; west coast of India is not studied in the same frequency.

Potentials of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for India [POWER]

Potentials of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for India [POWER]

Details will be posted soon